Faculty Profile  Faculty ProfileLast Modified Time: 10:17:08 AM Thu, 5 Feb 2015 
Dr. Jacqueline  Vickery
 Contact Information
Dr. Jacqueline Vickery
Assistant Professor-Media Arts
 
Contact address   1155 Union Circle, Denton, TX     Office LocationRTFP 237 
Email  jacqueline.vickery@unt.edu    Social Convergence Social Convergence   
Graduate Faculty Membership Status: Radio, Television, & Film   
toggle toggle  Professional Preparation
 Degree Major/Thesis/Dissertation Institution Year
Ph.D. Media Studies / Worth the Risk: The Role of Regulations and Norms in Shaping Teens' Digital Media Practices University of Texas at Austin 2012
M.A. Media Studies / In Her Own Words: Analyzing Girls' Identities, Communities, and Cultures through Blogs University of Texas at Austin 2008
B.A. Communication University of Oklahoma 2006
toggle toggle Courses Taught By Semester --- Organized Classes will be uploaded from THECB Data file
SemesterSubjectCourse NumberSectionCourse NameCalculated Semester Credit HoursSyllabus 
Spring 2015RTVF4450002Digital Literacies & Social Activism Download Syllabus
Spring 2015RTVF5660005Digital Literacies & Social Activism Download Syllabus
Fall 2014RTVF4475002Digital Media and Society Download Syllabus
Fall 2014RTVF4475001Digital Media and Society Download Syllabus
Fall 2014RTVF3360002Social Media Strategies Download Syllabus
Fall 2014RTVF3360001Social Media Strategies Download Syllabus
Summer 5W2 2014RTVF4450001Topics in Industry Studies Download Syllabus
Spring 2014RTVF5121001New Media Theory  
Spring 2014RTVF4450001Social Media Strategies Download Syllabus
Fall 2013RTVF5660001Industry Topics (Web 2.0: Theory, Research, Uses, & Effects)3 
Fall 2013RTVF4450001Industry Topics (Web 2.0: Theory, Research, Uses, & Effects)3Download Syllabus
Fall 2013RTVF5660002Industry Topics (Collaborative & Social Media Strategies)3 
Fall 2013RTVF4450002Industry Topics (Collaborative & Social Media Strategies)3Download Syllabus
Spring 2013RTVF4450004Industry Topics (Collaborative & Social Media Strategies3Download Syllabus
Spring 2013RTVF4450003Industry Topics (Web 2.0: Theory, Research, Uses, & Effects)3Download Syllabus
Fall 2012RTVF4450004Industry Topics (Web 2.0: Theory, Research, Uses, & Effects)3Download Syllabus
Fall 2012RTVF4450005Industry Topics (Collaborative & Social Media Strategies)3Download Syllabus
toggle toggle  Research and Expertise
Digital Media
 
Discourse Analysis
 
Informal Learning Environments
 
Privacy
 
Qualitative Research Methods
 
Youth Studies
 
toggle toggle Appointments
Duration (YYYY - YYYY or Present)RankDepartment / SchoolCollege / OfficeUniversity / Company
2012-PresentAssistant ProfessorRadio, Television, FilmArts & SciencesUNT
2010-2011Lead InstructorRadio, Television, FilmCommunicationUniversity of Texas
toggle toggle Faculty Workload
Duration (YYYY - YYYY)Percentage TeachingPercentage ResearchPercentage Service
2014-2015404020
2013-2014404020
2012-2013404020
toggle toggle Publications
  Type  Publications per page   
1  2 3 
  YearPublication  Type
2014
Published
"I don't have anything to hide, but...": the challenges and negotiations of social and mobile media privacy for non-dominant youth
Drawing from interviews and focus groups with teens in a low-income and ethnically diverse
high school in central Texas, this paper explores the unique social privacy challenges and
strategies of low-income and non-dominant youth. Situating the research in a broader
context in which non-dominant teens are increasingly surveilled, I demonstrate how teens
manage social privacy in at least three ways. First, they negotiate liminal boundaries of
what constitutes a communal or shareable mobile device, which are structured around
financial constraints. Second, through nonuse, they actively resist the ways mobile and
social media reconfigure social and physical spaces. Third, they deliberately use multiple
platforms as a way to cope with evolving privacy settings, social norms, and technological
affordances; this is a deliberate strategy intended to resist social convergence. Because lowincome
and non-dominant youth are increasingly surveilled by adults, peers, and
institutions, it is imperative that they find spaces that afford greater freedom of expression,
interest-based communities, and privacy.

Jacqueline Ryan Vickery
Information, Communication, & Society
Refereed(Peer reviewed) Journals
2014
Published
Talk Whenever, Wherever: How the U.S. mobile phone industry commodifies talk, genders youth mobile practices, and domesticates surveillance
Mobile service provider commercials afford insight into contemporary expectations and norms of cell phone use within the family structure and reveal current tensions and gendered expectations related to the domestication of technology. This article analyzes forty-two US cell phone commercials from 2005 to 2014.The sample only considers commercials that include parents, youth, and families. Discourse analysis considers the themes, gendered representations, and constructions of technology as portrayed by the cell phone industry. I identify three dominant themes throughout the commercials: (1) the commodification of talk, (2) gendered stereotypes of teens, moms, and dads, and (3) the legitimization of surveillance, mostly around teen girls. Additionally, I argue the sociotechnical shift from talking to texting to data plays a significant role in the evolution of how mobile practices are constructed and gendered.
Jacqueline Ryan Vickery
Journal of Children and Media
Refereed(Peer reviewed) Journals
2014
Published
Youth Teaching Youth: Learning to code as an example of interest-driven learning
 
 
Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy
Journal Articles
2014
Published
The Role of After-School Digital Media Clubs in Closing Participation Gaps and Expanding Social Networks
 
 
Equity and Excellence in Education
Refereed(Peer reviewed) Journals
2013
Published
The Curious Case of Confession Bear: The reappropriation of online macro image memes
 
 
Information, Communication, & Society
Refereed(Peer reviewed) Journals
toggle toggle Conference Publications
  Type  Conference Publications per page   
1  2 3 4 
  YearPublication  TypeAcceptance Rate
2014
All Quiet on the Facebook Front: Teens' social and mobile media privacy strategies
Drawing from interviews and focus groups with teens in a low-income and ethnically diverse
high school in central Texas, this paper explores the unique social privacy challenges and
strategies of low-income and non-dominant youth. Situating the research in a broader
context in which non-dominant teens are increasingly surveilled, I demonstrate how teens
manage social privacy in at least three ways. First, they negotiate liminal boundaries of
what constitutes a communal or shareable mobile device, which are structured around
financial constraints. Second, through nonuse, they actively resist the ways mobile and
social media reconfigure social and physical spaces. Third, they deliberately use multiple
platforms as a way to cope with evolving privacy settings, social norms, and technological
affordances; this is a deliberate strategy intended to resist social convergence. Because lowincome
and non-dominant youth are increasingly surveilled by adults, peers, and
institutions, it is imperative that they find spaces that afford greater freedom of expression,
interest-based communities, and privacy.

Jacqueline Ryan Vickery
Association of Internet Researchers Conference
Refereed 
2014
“Mobile Phones, a Girl’s Best Friend?: How the mobile phone industry legitimizes surveillance, commodifies talk and genders technology.”
 
 
Society for Cinema & Media Studies
Refereed 
2014
“Kids Teaching Kids: Web design and peer learning at a public library”.
 
 
Digital Media & Learning
Refereed30%
2014
“Panic in the Classroom!”: Youth, the internet, and the mobilization of risk via federal policies.”
 
 
Console-ing Passions: Feminist Media Conference
Refereed 
2013
#Fail: What can we learn from unsuccessful after school digital media club experiences?
 
 
Digital Media & Learning
Refereed25%
toggle toggle Editorships
Duration (YYYY - YYYY or Present)OrganizationPositionClassification
2008-2010FlowTVManaging Editor 
2007-2010FlowTVSpecial Issue Editor 
toggle toggle Lectures/Symposia
YearTitleRoleOrganization
2014Nobody Panic!: Historicizing, Contexualizing, and Learning to Embrace Social Media in an Educational SettingInvited SpeakerBirdville ISD
2012Television Viewing in the Age of Social MedialecturerUniversity of North Texas
2012Social Media Revolutions?lecturerUniversity of North Texas
2011Telegraphy: Historical Developments and Contemporary LegacieslecturerUniversity of Texas at Austin
2010Discursive Comparisons and Generational Differences Regarding Home Media UsepresenterComparing Media Trajectories in the U.S. and Portugal Symposium
2009Addressing Identity and Community on Girls' BlogslecturerUniversity of Texas at Austin
2009Historical Development and Definitions of Social Networking SiteslecturerUniversity of Texas at Austin
2008Contextualizing Social Networking SiteslecturerUniversity of Texas at Austin
toggle toggle  News
Making Media Watching Less Wonky
 
Austin Chronicle

toggle toggle Presentations and Projects
  Presentations/Projects per page   
1  
Start DateEnd DatePresentation/Project
2011 2011 Connected Learning Research Network - "The Digital Edge" | The Digital Edge
A greater diversity of young people in the U.S. are using digital media than ever before. So, why do issues related to technology, diversity, and equity continue to matter today? “The Digital Edge” is designed to explore how students, teachers, and families are engaging digital media in the face of significant social, financial, educational, and familial challenges. Interdisciplinary in its scope, our team draws from a range of perspectives including digital media studies, the sociology of education, theories of social and cultural capital, learning sciences, gender studies, popular culture, race and ethnic studies, demography, design, and youth and cultural studies. Our research is based on extensive interviews, participant observations, ethnography and creative collaborations with students and teachers from a Central Texas High school. Team members are also exploring the design and implementation of digital media learning with a focus on game design and digital video production. In addition to observing students in both in-school and out-of-school learning environments, we seek to understand the many different nodes"peer, familial, online, extra-curricular"that shape their learning ecologies. Connected learning in edge communities is a central challenge in the creation of a more equitable digital future through the expansion of digital literacy, the transformation of learning, and the enrichment of the digital and mobile media practices of young people.
2011 2011 International School of Digital Transformation | ISDT
The third annual International School on Digital Transformation, was held July 17-22 in Porto, Portugal. Advanced students and emerging professionals, social entrepreneurs, and activists from around the world with an interest in digital technology and the enrichment of civil society met that week for a series of pre-scheduled and participant-organized sessions.. For the past two years, this intensive residential program has brought together scholars, policy experts, community advocates, designers, and hackers to explore the potential for digital media to empower citizens, strengthen communities, and contribute to a more vibrant civil society. The School is named for Gary Chapman, an internationally renowned Internet policy expert and member of the faculty at the LBJ School of Public Affairs at UT Austin who founded this innovative program and passed away suddenly last year. His life continues to inspire the School.
2009 2010 UT-Austin Portugal Digital Inclusion and Participation Research Project | Digital Inclusion and Participation
In those societies with access to new media, concern continues to grow about the digital divide, between generations and between majority and minority social groups. In Portuguese society, this challenge presents some specific characteristics, marked by major cultural and educational differences and by the very different levels of digital literacy that distinguish the access and use of these media by adults and children. Children and youth younger than 18 year are ahead of adults in access and use, to the contrary of what happens in the majority of other European countries.

Portugal has passed from being a country of emigrants to becoming a country of immigrants, from its old colonies in Africa and Brazil in the last few decades, and more recently of immigrants from the countries of Eastern Europe. Access and use of the digital media also vary between children that have these media at home and in their room, and those who only get to use them at school and in public access where their use is limited and conditioned by circumstances
toggle toggle Intramural Funding
 Performance PeriodTitleSponsorFundingRoleStatus
2013Implications of Digital Media, Policies, and Public Libraries in the Lives of Minority YouthUNT Jr. Faculty Summer Research Fellowship$5,000Principal InvestigatorActive
toggle toggle Peer Reviewer Activities
YearAgency/OrganizationField of Expertise
2015Critical Arts: South-North Cultural & Media Studiesyouth, social networking sites, social media
2014Journal of Digital & Media Literacyliteracy, youth
2013Journal of Family Issuesparent/youth relationships
2012Journal of Children and Mediasocial media
2012Journal of Web Engineering and Technologysocial networking sites
2011Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropologysocial media and youth
2010FlowTVsports and media
2009FlowTVsocial media
toggle toggle Affiliations
MacArthur Foundation's Connected Learning Research Network
Associated researcher for Digital Media Learning Hub
toggle toggle Teaching
Collaborative & Social Media Strategies
 

Communication, Technology, & Society
 

Digital Literacies & Social Activism
 
This course examines the intersection of media literacy, participatory cultures, network society, media advocacy, and social activism within the context of evolving technologies and social practices. The concept of literacy is undergoing a transformation as a result of changes in media, technology, education, and society. Scholars, educators, and professionals are recognizing the importance of digital literacy to citizenship, education, information-sharing, identity exploration, and community building. In order to be digitally literate you must understand technological affordances of communities and online tools, the pedagogical implications of participatory media cultures, the ethics and legal struggles around authorship and intellectual property, changing notions of public and private, and know how to leverage knowledge and skills in an increasingly global and networked society.

New media provide avenues for students and citizens to collaborate, organize, and share ideas across different networks and can be powerful tools for social change and education. In this course, students will critically consider how media can be used as a tool to advocate for social/political change and social justice. While engaging in scholarly and activist literature on media, social change, and advocacy, students will work together on a project/campaign/movement/advocacy of their choice. The class is designed to be collaborative, participatory, and project-based. Students will create media, curate an online presence, participate in online communities, and work together on creative multimedia projects that serve an awareness building and/ or social activist purpose.

New Media Theory
 

Web 2.0: Theory, Research, Uses, & Effects
 

toggle toggle Mentoring/Advising
Duration (YYYY - YYYY or Present)Student NameClassificationTypeProject/Thesis/Dissertation
2015-PresentVictoria HicksSeniorUndergraduate Mentoring/AdvisingSpecial Problems
2015-PresentCourtney BabbSeniorUndergraduate Mentoring/AdvisingSpecial Problems
2015-PresentShelia CrutcherMaster'sGraduate Mentoring/AdvisingThesis
2014-PresentDan GrunewaldMaster'sGraduate Mentoring/AdvisingThesis
2014-PresentHannah BeaversMaster'sGraduate Mentoring/AdvisingThesis
2014-PresentStephanie OliverMaster'sGraduate Mentoring/AdvisingThesis
2013-PresentAshton LewisJuniorUndergraduate ResearchHonors Project
2013-PresentTaylor JamesSeniorUndergraduate ResearchProject
2012-PresentAshley ConroyMaster'sGraduate Mentoring/AdvisingThesis
2012-PresentLa Shae LeonardMaster'sGraduate Mentoring/AdvisingThesis
2012-PresentGabe OttesonMaster'sGraduate Mentoring/AdvisingThesis
2012-2013Coralee TriggerSeniorUndergraduate Mentoring/AdvisingSpecial Problems
2011-2012Tabatha WebbSeniorUndergraduate Mentoring/AdvisingPre-Grad School Mentoring Program
2011-2012Kim CungJuniorUndergraduate Mentoring/AdvisingPre-Grad School Mentoring Program
2011-2012Inara FernandezJuniorUndergraduate Mentoring/AdvisingPre-Grad School Mentoring Program
toggle toggle Committees
Duration (YYYY - YYYY or Present)CommitteePositionClassification
2013-PresentAwards & Events CommitteeMemberDept.
2012-PresentGraduate Curriculum CommitteeMemberDept.
2012-PresentSocial Media CommitteeMemberDept.
2012-PresentDigital Media Studies Research Cluster & Certificate ProgramFounding MemberCollege (CAS)
toggle toggle Memberships
Duration (YYYY - YYYY or Present)OrganizationPositionClassification
2011-PresentConnected Learning Research NetworkAssociated ResearcherMacArthur Foundation
Present-Association of Internet ResearchersMember 
Present-Society for Cinema and Media StudiesMember 
toggle toggle Honors and Recognitions
YearTitleHonoring Organization
2012Digital Media & Learning Summer FellowMacArthur Foundation
2011Jesse H. Jones Endowed Centennial FellowshipCollege of Communication, University of Texas
toggle toggle Professional Community Engagement
YearOrganizationRoleType of Service
2013ELITE Experience Outreach ProgramPresenterCommunity outreach
2013Denton High School Career DayPresenterCommunity outreach
toggle toggle Biographical Sketch
Jacqueline Vickery
Jacqueline Vickery conducts research on teens’ digital media practices as they intersect with issues such as digital equity, identity politics, digital literacy, privacy, informal learning, and school policies. She approaches research from a qualitative perspective and draws methodologically from ethnography, discourse analysis, and feminist media theory. In addition to presenting at many national and international conferences, her work is published in peer reviewed journals, edited anthologies, online journals, and encyclopedias.

Additionally, Dr. Vickery is an Associated Researcher for the “The Digital Edge,” which is an ethnographic research project funded by the MacArthur Foundation’s Connected Learning Research Network. The interdisciplinary project explores how students, teachers, and families are engaging digital media in the face of significant social, financial, educational, and familial challenges. The project seeks to understand the many different nodes " peer, familial, online, extra-curricular " that shape young people's learning ecologies.

Also, she was a 2012 MacArthur Foundation Digital Media & Learning Summer Research Fellow and has served as a Managing Editor for the online journal Flow.org. Her dissertation research was awarded the Jesse H. Jones Endowed Centennial Fellowship by the College of Communication at the University of Texas.

Media Studies Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, 2012
Media Studies M.A., University of Texas at Austin, 2008
Communication B.A., University of Oklahoma, 2006

toggle toggle Additional Information
Jacqueline Vickery
jvickery.com

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