Faculty Profile  Faculty ProfileLast Modified Time: 11:59:47 AM Mon, 24 Aug 2015 
 Donald Keith Mitchener
 Contact Information
Donald Keith Mitchener
Lecturer-History
 
Contact address   1155 Union Circle #310650, Denton, TX 76203-5017     
Email  donald.mitchener@unt.edu    Contact Number (940) 565-4215    Fax No: (940) 369-8838   
Keywords navy marine corps history maritime strategy   
Graduate Faculty Membership Status: Associate Membership-August 31, 2014   
toggle toggle  Professional Preparation
 Degree Major/Thesis/Dissertation Institution Year
PhD American History University of North Texas 2006
MA European History University of North Texas 2000
BA History Mississippi State University 1991
toggle toggle Courses Taught By Semester --- Organized Classes will be uploaded from THECB Data file
SemesterSubjectCourse NumberSectionCourse NameCalculated Semester Credit HoursSyllabus 
Fall 2015HIST4260001Topics in History Download Syllabus
Fall 2015HIST2610003United States History to 1865 Download Syllabus
Fall 2015HIST2610001United States History to 1865 Download Syllabus
Summer 5W2 2015HIST2620001United States History Since 1865 Download Syllabus
Spring 2015HIST4262001Topics in European History Download Syllabus
Spring 2015HIST4230001The Age of the Reformation Download Syllabus
Spring 2015HIST4220001The Renaissance Download Syllabus
Fall 2014HIST4630001U.S. Navy, 1775 to Present : Sails Download Syllabus
Fall 2014HIST2610004United States History to 1865 Download Syllabus
Fall 2014HIST2610001United States History to 1865 Download Syllabus
Summer 5W2 2014HIST2620002United States History Since 1865 Download Syllabus
Spring 2014HIST2610005United States History to 1865 Download Syllabus
Spring 2014HIST2610003United States History to 1865 Download Syllabus
Spring 2014HIST2610002United States History to 1865 Download Syllabus
Fall 2013HIST4261004Topics in US History Download Syllabus
Fall 2013HIST2620007United States History Since 1865 Download Syllabus
Fall 2013HIST2620005United States History Since 1865 Download Syllabus
Summer 5W2 2013HIST2620002United States History Since 1865 Download Syllabus
Spring 2013HIST4262002Topics in European History3Download Syllabus
Spring 2013HIST4260001Topics in History3Download Syllabus
Spring 2013HIST2620001United States History Since 18653Download Syllabus
Fall 2012HIST4630001U.S. Navy, 1775 to Present3Download Syllabus
Fall 2012HIST2620002United States History Since 18653Download Syllabus
Fall 2012HIST2620001United States History Since 18653Download Syllabus
Summer 2011HIST2620001United States History Since 18653Download Syllabus
Summer 2012HIST2610001United States History to 18653Download Syllabus
Summer 2011HIST2620001United States History Since 18653Download Syllabus
Summer 2011HIST2610001United States History to 18653Download Syllabus
Spring 2012HIST4260007Topics in History3Download Syllabus
Spring 2012HIST2620007United States History Since 18653Download Syllabus
Spring 2012HIST2620001United States History Since 18653Download Syllabus
Spring 2011HIST2620007United States History Since 18653Download Syllabus
Spring 2011HIST2620005United States History Since 18653Download Syllabus
Spring 2011HIST2620003United States History Since 18653Download Syllabus
Fall 2011HIST4630001U.S. Navy, 1775 to Present : Sails3Download Syllabus
Fall 2011HIST2620004United States History Since 18653Download Syllabus
Fall 2011HIST2620003United States History Since 18653Download Syllabus
Fall 2010HIST4630001U.S. Navy, 1775 to Present : Sails3Download Syllabus
Fall 2010HIST2620003United States History Since 18653Download Syllabus
Fall 2010HIST2620002United States History Since 18653Download Syllabus
toggle toggle  Research and Expertise
United States Naval and Marine Corps History; World War II Pacific Theater; Maritime History
 
toggle toggle Appointments
Duration (YYYY - YYYY or Present)RankDepartment / SchoolCollege / OfficeUniversity / Company
2007-PresentLecturerHistoryArts and SciencesUniversity of North Texas
2009Adjunct InstructorHistoryNorth Central Texas College 
2004-2007Adjunct InstructorHistoryNorth Central Texas College 
2000-2006Teaching FellowHistoryArts and SciencesUniversity of North Texas
2003-2004Adjunct InstructorHistoryCollin County Community College 
toggle toggle Faculty Workload
Duration (YYYY - YYYY)Percentage TeachingPercentage ResearchPercentage Service
2013-201460040
2010-201160040
toggle toggle Publications
  Type  Publications per page   
1  2 
  YearPublication  Type
2014
Accepted/In-press
"Naval Gunfire at Iwo Jima â€" The Perils of Doctrinal Myopia"
The United States Navy and Marine Corps developed during the 1930s a doctrine for assaulting defended beaches. One component of that doctrine was a description of the use of naval gunfire in support of assaulting troops. A very important aspect of such support, as brought out in the doctrine itself, was the preparation of the assault beach over a period of time preceding the sending of troops ashore. The consensus among historians of the Pacific war is that, while the Americans made mistakes, they learned valuable lessons and applied those lessons along the way. In the case of the invasion of Iwo Jima this consensus needs modification. Differences in priorities and consequent disagreements as to the proper amount of preliminary naval gunfire support to provide resulted in a gunfire plan that was not adequate to the task. The Japanese commander at Iwo put a defensive scheme in place that was meant to counter the American firepower advantage. In doing so he also inadvertently set a trap into which the Americans, following their amphibious warfare doctrine, would fall.
Donald K. Mitchener
Global War Studies
Refereed(Peer reviewed) Journals
2014
Accepted/In-press
"Trial by Battle: Roi-Namur and the Naval Gunfire Support 'Lessons of Tarawa'"
The assault of Tarawa Atoll in November of 1943 resulted in a reevaluation and modification of various aspects of the amphibious assault doctrine developed by the United States's Sea Services during the 1930s and early 1940s as well as techniques for the application of that doctrine. This was particularly true concerning the use of naval gunfire in support of landing operations. The first test of the newly refurbished naval gunfire doctrine and techniques came in late January of 1944 with the invasion of Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands, codenamed Operation FLINTLOCK. George Dyer, in his biography of Richmond Kelly Turner, claims that his subject viewed the operation as an adequate and successful test of the “lessons of Tarawa.” Was this an accurate assessment on Turner’s part? The author of this paper will look at the “lessons” and their application at Roi-Namur as well as other data to show that the invasion of this tiny dual islet was not a rigorous enough test to enable Turner nor anyone else to make such a determination.
Donald K. Mitchener
Global War Studies
Refereed(Peer reviewed) Journals
2014
Published
"The Maestro of Naval Gunfire Support Planning: Richard L. Conolly and Naval Gunfire Support at Guam"
Rear Admiral Richard L. Conolly commanded amphibious attack forces in the Mediterranean and the Pacific during World War II. His experiences in the Mediterranean, under the tutelage of Vice Admiral H. Kent Hewitt, provided him with a different perspective on amphibious planning and execution than was common amongst those flag officers in the Pacific who had developed their amphibious warfare command skills under the rigorously watchful eye of Admiral Richmond Kelly Turner. The author of this paper will look at Conolly’s naval gunfire support plan for the assault of Guam and will compare it to Turner’s naval gunfire support plan for the assault of Saipan. This comparison will show that Conolly had absorbed the naval gunfire “lessons of Tarawa” more effectively than had Turner by July of 1944 and that his better understanding of them led him to apply those “lessons” more consistently
Donald K. Mitchener
Global War Studies
Refereed(Peer reviewed) Journals
2013
Published
“Amphibious Warfare” in The Encyclopedia of Military Science
 
Donald K. Mitchener
SAGE Publications
Encyclopedia Article
2010
Published
"United States Marine Corps" "Office of Naval Intelligence" "Fleet Intelligence Centers" in Spies, Wiretaps and Secret Operations: An Encyclopedia of American Espionage
 
Donald K. Mitchener
ABC-CLIO
Encyclopedia Article
toggle toggle Lectures/Symposia
YearTitleRoleOrganization
2014Remembering D-Day: 6 June 1944PresenterRichardson East Rotary Club
2014The Origins of the Marine Raiders during World War IIPresenter and PanelistAdmiral Nimitz Foundation Symposium
2012War In the PacificLecturerChristian Military Fellowship
toggle toggle Peer Reviewer Activities
YearAgency/OrganizationField of Expertise
2012-2015Global War StudiesWorld War II in the Pacific
toggle toggle Teaching
HIST 1060 World History from the 16th Century
 

HIST 2610 United States History to 1865
 

HIST 2620 United States History since 1865
 

HIST 4220 The Renaissance
 
This course covers European political, social, intellectual, and cultural history ca. 1300-1600. A number of themes will be explored in an effort to give the student as complete a portrait as is possible in the time allotted of this very important period in the development of what would become the most dominant region of the world by the eighteenth century. It was during these years that Europe transitioned from the Middle Ages to the Modern era. It was the time of artists such as Masaccio, Da Vinci, Raphael, and Michelangelo; writers such as Petrarch, Machiavelli, More, and Montaigne; composers such as Machaut, Dufay, Josquin, and Byrd; and rulers such as Ferdinand and Isabella, Francis I, Charles V, and Henry VIII. It is hoped that the student will come away from this class with a better understanding of what the early humanists meant when they pronounced their time to be "modern" relative to the years that came immediately before their own.

HIST 4230 The Age of the Reformation
 
This course covers European political, social, intellectual, and cultural history ca. 1517-1648. These were the years of the Lutheran, Calvinist, and English Reformations, the Catholic Reformation and Counter-Reformation, and the Wars of Religion. Out of these various conflicts - religious, political, and cultural - emerged a transformed Europe. The ideas that began to develop during the Renaissance gave birth to that which the early humanists called the "modern," but not in the way that many of them envisioned at the time. Upon this political and cultural foundation would be built absolutism, the Enlightenment, and everything else that we have come to know as "Europe." It is hoped that this course will provide the student with a better understanding of this important and formative period of Western Civilization.

HIST 4260 Maritime History during the Age of Sail, 1588-1838
 
This topics course, which I originated, is an upper-level undergraduate course consisting of an overview of the maritime history of the Age of Sail. The emphasis is on the creation of the European maritime empires of the 16th through the early 19th centuries. Course topics include the maritime aspects of European exploration of the world, the development of ships and navigational technology, naval developments, general maritime economic theory, and maritime cultural history.

HIST 4260 World War II in the Pacific
 
This topics course, which I originated, is an upper-level undergraduate course which looks at the entire Asia and Pacific War from 1931 to 1945. The emphasis is upon US participation, but the contribution of the British and other Allies is highlighted as well. Japan's reasons for going to war with the US, Britain, and other countries are considered and the strategies and tactics used by the Japanese during the war are analyzed. Students will come away from this class with a better appreciation of the relationship between the Asia/Pacific War and the war in Europe and the Mediterranean as well as a better understanding of the reasoning behind decisions made by both American and Japanese commanders.

HIST 4262 The Rise of English Sea Power, 1399-1714
 
This topics course, which I originated, is an upper-level undergraduate course which is designed to teach students about the most important aspects of the late medieval and early modern history of the Navy Royal/Royal Navy of England/Britain.  Topics include the administrative and technological development of the English navy during the reigns of the Yorkist, Tudor, and Stuart monarchs and the Commonwealth Period, its use by those monarchs and the Commonwealth leaders in the rise to power of the English state from 1399 until 1714, and the influence of both the navy and the sea upon English culture and society during the period under study.

HIST 4630 United States Naval History
 
This course, which I originated, is an upper-level undergraduate course consisting of an overview of the history of the United States Navy from its origins during the Colonial Period to its support of Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom as well as a study of the place of the U.S. Navy in American society.  Fundamental military and naval concepts are stressed and the differences between land and sea warfare are explored and explained.

toggle toggle Mentoring/Advising
Duration (YYYY - YYYY or Present)Student NameClassificationTypeProject/Thesis/Dissertation
2009-Present Departmental Undergraduate AdvisorUndergraduate Mentoring/Advising 
2012-2013Tom Davis Graduate Mentoring/AdvisingPILT
toggle toggle Committees
Duration (YYYY - YYYY or Present)CommitteePositionClassification
2009-PresentUndergraduate CommitteeMemberex officio
2010U.S. History Textbook Selection CommitteeMember 
toggle toggle Memberships
Duration (YYYY - YYYY or Present)OrganizationPositionClassification
1998-PresentPhi Kappa PhiMember 
1997-PresentPhi Alpha ThetaMember 
2001-2002Phi Alpha ThetaPresident of Alpha Lambda Chapter, University of North Texas 
toggle toggle Biographical Sketch
Donald K. Mitchener
I was born in Mobile, Alabama, and raised in the small town of Quitman, Mississippi.  I met my wife when we were both students at Mississippi State University.  Our daughter is a graduate of UNT with a degree in Interdisciplinary Art and Design.  I have had a deep, abiding love of the study of history since I was a child, a study which still fascinates me.  I also love the study of the sea, most particularly the history of human action upon and below its surface.  My hobbies include reading, listening to music, and playing saxophone.

toggle toggle Additional Information
2014 Conference 1944: Seventy Years On
I served on the coordinating and review committee for a major conference on World War II to be held at the Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst, England, in the spring of 2014. I also presented a paper. Papers dealt with various aspects of World War II his

2014 Conference on Naval and Maritime Power in the Two World Wars
I presented a paper at a conference in Greenwich, England, in the spring of 2014. Papers will deal with the contemporary relevance and historical importance of naval and maritime power in World Wars I and II.

2015 Conference on World War II in the Pacific
I have been selected to serve on the coordinating and review committee for a major conference on World War II in the Pacific to be held in Canberra, Australia, in the summer of 2015.

5th Regional International Security/Internal Safety Conference
2011 - Presented paper entitled "Naval Gunfire Preparation at Iwo Jima:  An Example of Failed Joint Operations" at the above-referenced conference in April at Mississippi State University.

Book negotiations
I am presently in negotiations concerning the publishing of my dissertation as a book with possible target date of fall 2015.

Global War Studies Book Reviews
2012 - Review of Ian W. Toll's Pacific Crucible: War at Sea in the Pacific, 1941-1942

2013 - Review of David J. Ulbrich's Preparing for Victory: Thomas Holcomb and the Making of the Modern Marine Corps, 1936-1943

2013 - Review of John Prados's Islands of Destiny: The Solomon Islands Campaign and the Eclipse of the Rising Sun

Global-Regional Nexus: The Sea and the Second World War
2012 - Presented paper entitled "Naval Gunfire at Iwo Jima: The Perils of Doctrinal Myopia."
This paper was selected to be published as part of the conference proceedings.

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